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Download Free Bokeh Video Clips: Full HD Film with Bokeh Lights Effects


Film Bokeh Full Bokeh Lights Bokeh Video Download 2020: What You Need to Know




If you are a fan of film photography or videography, you might have heard of the term "bokeh". But what exactly is bokeh and how can you download and edit film bokeh full bokeh lights bokeh video in 2020? In this article, we will answer these questions and more. We will explain what bokeh is, what film bokeh is, how to download film bokeh videos, and how to edit them. By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of film bokeh and how to use it for your creative projects.




film bokeh full bokeh lights bokeh video download 2020


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What is Bokeh?




Bokeh is a Japanese word that means "blur" or "haze". It refers to the aesthetic quality of the out-of-focus areas in a photograph or a video. It is usually created by using a large aperture, a long focal length, or a close distance between the camera and the subject. Bokeh can create a soft, dreamy, or romantic effect that draws attention to the main subject and adds depth and dimension to the image.


Definition and Examples of Bokeh




According to the Oxford English Dictionary, bokeh is defined as "the visual quality of the out-of-focus areas of a photographic image, especially as rendered by a particular lens". For example, in this image, the flowers in the foreground are in focus, while the background is blurred. This creates a contrast between the sharp and the soft elements, making the flowers stand out more.



Types and Characteristics of Bokeh




Bokeh can be classified into different types based on its shape, size, color, and quality. Some common types of bokeh are:


  • Circular bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus points of light appear as circles. This can be achieved by using a large aperture or a lens with a circular diaphragm. For example, in this image, the street lights create circular bokeh.




  • Hexagonal bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus points of light appear as hexagons. This can be achieved by using a smaller aperture or a lens with a hexagonal diaphragm. For example, in this image, the sun creates hexagonal bokeh.




  • Custom-shaped bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus points of light appear as custom shapes, such as hearts, stars, or letters. This can be achieved by using a DIY filter or a lens with a special aperture. For example, in this image, the lights create heart-shaped bokeh.




  • Smooth bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus areas are smooth and uniform, without any harsh edges or patterns. This can be achieved by using a high-quality lens with a smooth diaphragm and a low number of aperture blades. For example, in this image, the background is smooth bokeh.




  • Swirly bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus areas have a swirling or circular motion, creating a dynamic and artistic effect. This can be achieved by using a vintage or specialty lens with a curved or tilted focal plane. For example, in this image, the leaves create swirly bokeh.




Bokeh can also vary in its color, depending on the light source, the lens, and the filter. Some common colors of bokeh are:


  • Warm bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus areas have a yellow, orange, or red hue, creating a warm and cozy atmosphere. This can be achieved by using a tungsten or incandescent light source, a lens with a warm coating, or a warm filter. For example, in this image, the candles create warm bokeh.




  • Cool bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus areas have a blue, green, or purple hue, creating a cool and calm atmosphere. This can be achieved by using a fluorescent or LED light source, a lens with a cool coating, or a cool filter. For example, in this image, the snowflakes create cool bokeh.




  • Colorful bokeh: This is when the out-of-focus areas have multiple colors, creating a colorful and festive atmosphere. This can be achieved by using a multicolored light source, such as fairy lights or fireworks, or a rainbow filter. For example, in this image, the fireworks create colorful bokeh.




What is Film Bokeh?




Film bokeh is a type of bokeh that is produced by using film cameras or film simulation software. Film bokeh has some distinctive features that make it different from digital bokeh. Some of these features are:


  • Film grain: Film bokeh has a natural and organic texture that is created by the film grain. Film grain is the random variation of brightness and color in the film emulsion. Film grain can add character and mood to the image, depending on the type and size of the grain.



  • Film noise: Film bokeh has a subtle and pleasing noise that is created by the film processing. Film noise is the variation of brightness and color in the film due to chemical reactions and physical defects. Film noise can add realism and depth to the image, depending on the quality and age of the film.



  • Film color: Film bokeh has a unique and rich color that is created by the film color rendition. Film color rendition is the way that film reproduces colors based on its chemical composition and sensitivity. Film color rendition can add style and emotion to the image, depending on the film brand and type.



Film bokeh can create a nostalgic and artistic effect that appeals to many photographers and videographers. Film bokeh can also enhance the subject and the story of the image by adding contrast, drama, or mystery.


The History and Evolution of Film Bokeh




Film bokeh has been around since the invention of photography in the 19th century. However, it was not until the 20th century that film bokeh became more popular and recognized as an artistic element. Some of the milestones in the history and evolution of film bokeh are:


  • In 1917, Japanese photographer Shinjiro Uemura coined the term "boke-aji", which means "the taste of blur" in his book "Shashin no Kyokasho" (The Textbook of Photography). He described bokeh as a subjective and aesthetic preference that varies from person to person and from lens to lens.



  • In 1935, Kodak introduced the first 35mm color film, Kodachrome, which had a high resolution and a vivid color rendition. Kodachrome became one of the most popular and iconic films for bokeh photography, especially for portraits and landscapes.



  • In 1959, Nikon launched the first SLR camera with a pentaprism viewfinder, the Nikon F, which allowed photographers to see the exact image that would be captured by the lens. This enabled photographers to control and experiment with bokeh more easily and creatively.



  • In 1962, American photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt took the famous photo of Marilyn Monroe with a blurred background, which showcased the beauty and glamour of film bokeh. The photo was taken with a Leica M3 camera and a 50mm f/0.95 Noctilux lens, which had a very shallow depth of field and a smooth bokeh.




  • In 1997, Japanese photographer Takashi Kitajima started a series of photos called "Extra Bokeh", which featured extreme bokeh effects created by using a tilt-shift lens. The photos depicted urban scenes with colorful and distorted bokeh, creating a surreal and futuristic impression.




  • In 2006, American photographer Ryan Brenizer popularized a technique called "the Brenizer method", which involved taking multiple photos of a scene with a wide aperture and stitching them together in post-processing. The technique created a large image with a shallow depth of field and a creamy bokeh, mimicking the look of medium format or large format film cameras.




The Benefits and Challenges of Film Bokeh




Film bokeh has many benefits and challenges for photographers and videographers. Some of the benefits are:


  • Film bokeh can add interest and emotion to an image by creating a sense of depth, atmosphere, and mood.



  • Film bokeh can highlight and isolate the main subject by making it stand out from the background.



  • Film bokeh can convey a message or a story by using symbolism, contrast, or metaphor.



  • Film bokeh can show the personality and style of the photographer or videographer by expressing their artistic vision and preference.



Some of the challenges are:


  • Film bokeh can be difficult to achieve and control, as it depends on many factors, such as the lens, the aperture, the focal length, the distance, the light source, and the film type.



  • Film bokeh can be expensive and time-consuming, as it requires buying and processing film, which can be costly and limited in availability.



  • Film bokeh can be unpredictable and inconsistent, as it can vary in shape, size, color, and quality depending on the shooting conditions and the film characteristics.



  • Film bokeh can be distracting or overwhelming, as it can draw attention away from the subject or clutter the image with too much blur or noise.



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